Vulnerabilities of the Connected Car

arxan-connected-cars

I like this infographic (click above to expand image) though with due respect to the authors, I’m skeptical about the claim that ‘connected cars’ (as if there’s only one thing called a connected car) have 10 times the amount of code in a Boeing 787. But I’m nitpicking. I appreciate that this graphic specifically calls out the OBD-II port as a worry spot as well as noting that insurance dongles lack security. It would be great to do security analysis on all existing dongles in significant circulation to see how bad things really are. I also quite liked this: “LTE coverage and Wifi in the car expose you to the same vulnerabilities as a house on wheels.” That’s simple and effective writing – bravo Arxan.

The Recommendations at the bottom are aimed at consumers. They’re all reasonable and this is the first time I’m seeing “Don’t jailbreak your car.” Again, good on you, Arxan. I’m amused by the suggestion to check your outlets periodically and make sure you know what’s installed. It’s like a combination of encouraging safe sex for your car combined with ‘watch out for spoofed ATMs.’

Arxan is, however, a B2B company, so I would like to see, in addition to consumer recommendations, industry recommendations. Of course, those suggestions are part the services they offer so they can’t give away too much for free, but still – a few pearls of wisdom would be welcome. I know it’s too much to ask for policy-oriented suggestions – especially ones that raise costs – so here are a few:

  • Security Impact Analysis should be a regulatory requirement for all cars that rise above a certain threshold of connectivity (a topic for exploration)

  • Strengthen data breach notification laws (a general suggestion, not just for cars or IoT)

  • Car companies should be required to have CISOs